Winter in Lapland 2009 – 3

I spent the evening learning some traditional cooking.  Ingvar and Anki were not impressed with my attempt at making Lingon (Cow Berry) sylt in September so they were keen to teach me the traditional recipe.

We used;

4 lites of Lingon berries

20 decilitres of water

80 decilitres of sugar

Here the Lingon are being measured out into a large saucepan

winter-2009-10

The mixture is brought to the boil and then simmered for 15 minutes and any froth forming on the top must be skinned off and removed.

winter-2009-11-large

The sauce is then left to cool and put into jars.

The Lingon sylt is traditionally served with Reindeer meat.  In the picture below I have it with Reindeer blood pudding (the Swedish/Saami name for which I cannot remember).

reindeer-pudding-medium

Anki had defrosted a large White Fish (Sik in Swedish) to cook for our evening meal.

I have smoked White fish at my cabin

smoked-fish-medium1

but this one had not been smoked.

white-fish-1-large

Anki filleted it, placed some herbs between the fillets and then wrapped them in bacon.

white-fish-2-medium

It was then baked in the oven and having never had fish cooked in bacon I would certainly do it again as it was fantastic!!

white-fish-3-large

Advertisements

6 thoughts on “Winter in Lapland 2009 – 3

    • Hi Marina, Great to see you here ;>). Maybe it was Palt. It was stuffed with pieces of fat (pork I think). May I add your blog to my blog roll?

  1. To be honest my initial reaction to fish wrapped in bacon is not a good one but I learnt in Japan years ago don’t judge a food with your brain or eyes but by your tastebuds!

    Was the bloodpudding firm like our black pudding?

  2. My family calls blood pudding “crub”. I have no idea if that’s how it’s spelled, or if it is a Norwegian, or Sammi word. I’ll have to ask my Grandpa.

  3. Yea of course you can add me. 🙂 I think its palt, looks like it and some have pork in it. You eat it with butter and lingonsylt. Reaaally good! You can do it without blood as well thats more ordinary in Sweden.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s