Work on cabin in garden-1

I was concerned that the cabin we had purchased and moved to our garden

would not b sufficiently insulated for guests to stay in during the winter.  Upon removing a section of the chip-board that lined the cabin, I found that there was only 4cms of insulation and of more concern was the fact that who ever had built the cabin, had lined the whole thing with plastic!  This had been preventing air circulating in the walls and so there was much mold, moisture and some rotten timbers.  I removed all the chip-board, plastic lining and the insulation, and put a heater in the cabin to help dry it out for a few days.

In order to increase the depth of insulation I also had to increase the depth of the timber framework.  Unfortunately the guy I buy all my sawn timber from here in the village still works in feet and inches and so all the timber I purchased I had to cut again into metric dimensions.  This took quite a lot of time.

After increasing the thickness of the walls I this lined the cabin with a thick, bitumen impregnated paper which we call “forhyvningspapper”.

This reduces moisture, but allows airflow.  Once the paper was up, I put 10cms of insulation on top.  The person we bought the house from had left quite a lot of new wood panels so I decided to use these to line the cabin.

After completing the walls, I did the same thing with the roof, but put in 20cms of insulation.

While out in the forest one day I found a little wood burning stove on the site where an old cabin had been demolished.  The stove would be just right for the cabin so I decided to install it.  So before completing the ceiling I cut a hole through the roof where the stove flue would go.

Not having much money now meant that I could not afford to buy the expensive insulated flue I required, so instead I decided to make my own.  But more about that next time.

 

 

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